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  #1  
Old 01-11-2011, 02:21 PM
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Sohmakun Sohmakun is offline
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Countries for Infant Adoptions

Good morning everyone!

I used to come on these boards alot but I haven't because I decided to try artifical insemination to have a baby. Anyways, none of those cycles worked and I am seriously considering international adoption.

However, I wanted to know if their are any countries that will allow single women to adopt infants under 12 months at homecoming. Please do not mention Ethiopia to me - I have already considered adopting from there and vetoed it because of the multiple trips and concerns of trafficking.

Are their any countries open for international adoption that will allow single women to adopt young, healthy babies (under 12 months at homecoming)? I am open to any race and would prefer a country that has only one trip.

it seems like since I have last posted regularly (which was about 2006) most of the countries open to international adoption have closed like Guatemala, China, Ukraine, Vietnam and Nepal - international adoption is starting to become frustrating
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  #2  
Old 01-11-2011, 03:58 PM
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i can't think of any....
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  #3  
Old 01-11-2011, 04:49 PM
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I don't know of any either.

You might check out the State Department website. Welcome to Adoption.State.Gov Their information is generally up to date and accurate regarding which countires are open, which children can be adopted, PAP requirements, adoption procedures, etc.

Good luck!
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  #4  
Old 01-12-2011, 09:42 AM
sak9645 sak9645 is offline
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International adoption of infants

Nowadays, it is very difficult, though not completely impossible, to bring home a child who is under 12 months of age. The reason is simple. The U.S. and most foreign countries are increasingly trying to be sure that adoptions are conducted in an ethical, legal way, and that every opportunity is provided for a child to be raised within his/her birth country. The adoption paperwork requirements established by the U.S. government, the country of the child's citizenship, and -- in many cases -- the Hague Convention on intercountry adoption (an international treaty) may take many months to complete, but ultimately, the adoptive parents get a certain degree of comfort that their child was not bought or stolen, and that he/she had little hope of finding a family in his/her birth country.

Since you are single and unwilling to make multiple trips, you also have some constraints that make some countries impossible. You mentioned Ethiopia. Russia, traditionally favored by single women, would also be out of the question for you, since Russia tends to involve anywhere from two to four trips, these days. And it is not just a matter of unwillingness to travel; the more you have to travel, especially if your child comes from a remote area, like Siberia, the higher your overall costs will be, with fees sometimes reaching $50,000 or more.

In general, you will have the greatest likelihood of finding an infant in some of the most newly opened countries, since it is those countries that are likely to have a less well-developed adoption system and more informal processes. You might want to look, for example, at places like Rwanda and Congo in Africa, or Belize in Latin America. But because countries like these have not been open to international adoption for a long time, they are inherently riskier than others. "Glitches" are more likely, and rules may change from minute to minute. With such countries, it is absolutely imperative that you work with very highly experienced, ethical adoption agencies, or you could wind up losing your money and not getting a child.

Sharon
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  #5  
Old 01-12-2011, 10:40 AM
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I know some people are bringing infants home from DR of Congo that are under 12 months. I know a family bringing home 2 infant boys who are a week apart sometime this month who are 7 or 8 months old. I do not know anything about if singles can adopt from Congo or not though. I believe Spence Chapin and MLJ (MJK? Something like that) are two agencies working in Congo, but I don't have any info on either. There is a Congoadopt group on Yahoo.
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  #6  
Old 01-21-2011, 06:35 PM
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Taiwan? I know believe that single woman can still adopt, and the babies are young, but maybe not under 12 months. Still very young in international adoption standards. Maybe I am wrong. But check it out.
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  #7  
Old 01-24-2011, 01:46 PM
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Taiwan, Japan and the DRC are the three that come to mind. I'm pretty sure Japan would be an independent adoption, and with Taiwan I'm pretty sure you're matched with someone who is pregnant, like a domestic US adoption.
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  #8  
Old 02-05-2011, 06:06 PM
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Mu daughter was 11 months old when I brought her home from Russia ..
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  #9  
Old 02-05-2011, 10:22 PM
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Taiwan is a very small program with lots of lots of people who moved to that program when China slowed down. Not saying it is impossible, but some agencies are not even accepting applications for people wanting to adopt an infant b/c there are just not that many infants available. Most agencies will work to match you with an older child or special needs child.

If I were single and wanted a very young child, I would go with Russia. More than one trip, but you can still get an infant and they are open to singles and somewhat stable in the rules. We have BTDT with a new program and are now entering year 3 of waiting to bring home our son from Kyrgyzstan.

Last edited by karla-k : 02-05-2011 at 10:24 PM.
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  #10  
Old 02-06-2011, 06:25 PM
sak9645 sak9645 is offline
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Adopting young babies.

Taiwan isn't a good option right now. It's a very small, relatively prosperous country, so there are few healthy infants available for adoption. Up until the past couple of years, it was relatively easy for a person to adopt a healthy infant in a short time frame, because few Westerners knew much about the Taiwan's program.

In the past few years, the number of countries with young babies available decreased. Most significantly, the number of available healthy infants in China decreased, and wait times increased to 4 years and appear poised to increase more. In an effort to reduce wait times, China also tightened its requirements for families, making many families ineligible.

Looking for other options, families interested in Chinese babies quickly discovered Taiwan. Many families rushed to apply to adopt there. Today, the number of families seeking to adopt greatly outweighs the number of babies available in Taiwan. In an effort to keep long waits from developing, most agencies have closed their programs to new applicants until people who have already applied have been matched.

It is very hard, nowadays, to find an opening, though if you make a concerted effort and meet the increasingly strict requirements -- singles may or may not be acceptable -- of the particular Taiwanese social service organization that works with the adoption agency, you may be able to proceed. Independent adoption is possible, but the State Department warns families to avoid the use of certain Taiwanese facilitators, who are not authorized by Taiwan to place children. The USCIS will not grant a visa to a child who is adopted in a manner considered unlawful by the foreign country of his/her citizenship.

Japan has never been an easy program for adoptive families. Aside from the fact that Japan is a very prosperous country, with few children placed for reasons of poverty, the traditional culture does not support adoption, and international adoption in particular. In general, families of Japanese heritage and non-Japanese families living in Japan have the greatest likelihood of success.

There is a very strong belief in the "blood tie" in Japan. Even if a woman cannot parent, she will not usually consent to domestic or, especially, international adoption of her child, because of the perception that no one except a person with ulterior motives (slavery, prostitution, etc.) would adopt someone who is not not of his/her blood. Many of the children in Japanese orphanages remain there for years, because they are not legally relinquished, but not able to live with their parents or relatives.

At this point, there are very few U.S. adoption agencies with Japan programs, and most work primarily or exclusively with families where at least one spouse is of Japanese heritage. Independent adoption is possible, but is most likely to succeed, for non-Japanese families, if they can spend time in Japan, visiting orphanages and getting to know the staff, so that trust is built.

As far as the Democratic Republic of Congo, it must be considered a high-risk country, though right now, it does have young babies coming home in a short time frame.

The program is fairly new, with no real track record of stability; closure or changes in rules are more likely than in countries with long track records of working with the U.S. on adoption. Requirements are minimal, but that often means that their interpretation can vary, depending on the government officials who are involved in the process. Some of the individuals or organizations facilitating adoptions may not be experienced, or may not adhere to high standards of ethics.

The USCIS is likely to give special scrutiny to documents submitted with a child's visa application, because problems of authenticity have arisen with birth certificates and other paperwork from the DRC. If the USCIS determines that paperwork is not reliable, a visa will not be issued. This could mean that a person winds up with legal and moral responsibility for a child, but no way to bring him/her to the U.S.

If you do want to adopt from the DRC, be very careful when choosing an agency or facilitator. Check out that agency or person's experience and reputation, and talk to clients who have completed adoptions to find out how smoothly things went. This is true whether you use Americans or people within DRC, even lawyers licensed by the DRC government. Also, be sure to understand the medical risks in adoption, and to talk with professionals about a referral before accepting one. And, above all, recognize that a high tolerance for uncertainty will be an asset.

Overall, as people have indicated on this forum, adopting a young healthy infant has become very difficult, these days. In some ways, it's actually a good thing. In some countries, fewer such children are being placed for adoption, because the country is becoming more prosperous, and/or because domestic adoption is becoming more acceptable. This is great news for the children, even as it is painful for infertile families and others who came to the realization that adoption might be a good way to form their families.

While it is perfectly reasonable for such families to search for new, legitimate sources of infants to adopt, many people may also need some education about the joy of adopting children with minor, correctible special needs. In many foreign countries, a child with a limb difference, or even a large port wine stain, may be considered "unlucky" or cursed by the Devil. If he/she is unable to be raised by his/her parents, he/she may never get adopted. He/she may live out his/her childhood in an orphanage, and may never have the opportunity for education or job training. He/she may wind up on the streets as a beggar or a criminal. He/she may never marry, and may die young.

In the U.S., such a child may live the life of any other American kid. In some cases, the child may need some medical care or plastic surgery or prosthetics, but in other cases, no treatment will be needed. He/she can grow to be a productive, happy member of society.

When a lot of families think about special needs, they think about kids who will need lifelong care, who will never be able to live anything like a normal life. Certainly, some children with severe disabilities are available for adoption, and families equipped to meet their needs are greatly needed, but many families will be very surprised to learn that some children considered special needs abroad may look and act no different from the Little League superstar or the science fair winner next door.

Also, a lot of people assume that they won't have the "baby experience" if they don't adopt a newborn or infant under one year of age. I had that point of view once -- until my 18.5 month old from China changed my perspective. Many toddlers from overseas still have a lot of "baby" in them. My daughter weighed 17 lb., like some American six month olds. She wasn't daytime toilet trained till she was almost three, or nighttime trained till she was almost four. While she didn't use bottles, we could still snuggle while she drank from a sippy cup. She wanted to be fed for over six months after she came home, making up for lost Mommy time.

My daughter is 15 now -- a marvelous, high-achieving teenager. But I had plenty of "baby experience", and was quite ready to enjoy the experiences associated with her later development, also.

The older a child is, the more likely it is that he/she has had negative life experiences prior to adoption. So some parents will not be equipped to adopt a seven year old or a ten year old. No one should ever go into older child adoption, without being truly prepared. Still, a great many people have adopted older children, and seen those kids turn out surprisingly well. Whether they become rocket scientists or truck drivers, they often bring their parents much joy. So if you think you can handle some challenges, older child adoption may actually be a very satisfying way to go.

All in all, if you really want an infant, take a look at all of the countries mentioned, and any others that may open or reopen tomorrow. Also look at domestic adoption -- through an agency, through the foster care system, or private adoption where you locate a birthmother on your own and use a lawyer and a social worker for the legal requirements. The U.S. is often more single friendly than other countries, at least partly because there are so many singles like you, able to support and give a loving home to a child. In many foreign countries, it is very difficult for a single, widowed, or divorced woman to support and raise a child.

And do spend at least a few minutes considering whether you could parent a child with a minor special needs, or a toddler/preschooler. You may be able to make a wonderful family that way.

Sharon
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  #11  
Old 02-07-2011, 12:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladyofmoonlight
Taiwan, Japan and the DRC are the three that come to mind. I'm pretty sure Japan would be an independent adoption, and with Taiwan I'm pretty sure you're matched with someone who is pregnant, like a domestic US adoption.

There is a private US agency that does newborn/infant adoptions from Japan, but they only work with married couples childless couples, and they prefer that at least one parent have Japanese heritage.

As the others have said, Taiwan would not be a good option either.

You MIGHT be able to adopt an infant from Russia, particularly if you want a boy, but I would plan for a long wait and a very expensive adoption.

Honestly, your best bet is probably a domestic infant adoption. If you are open to any race and open to the possibility of drug/alcohol exposure, you should not have to wait terribly long for a match.
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Old 02-08-2011, 10:52 PM
karla-k karla-k is offline
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while waiting for our son in Kyrgyzstan, I have become "internet friends" with many single women hoping to adopt. In the 2.5 years I have known them, at least 4 have adopted domestically. Newborn infants, straight from the hospital, private domestic adoptions. Two of these women have adopted two newborn babies in that time frame.

I agree that if you are open to race and some other issues, you could probably adopt a newborn baby domestically in the time frame it would take you to adopt internationally.
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